Tag Archives: live

The Tour Guide FAQ

There are a few questions we get asked a lot as a guide, so I thought I’d write a little bit to quell that curiosity. Some of these are personal to me, but a lot of them will be accurate for guides across Europe.

How long have been a guide?

This is my second year with Busabout, I started training in April 2016 and haven’t looked back once.

Is it hard to be a guide?

It can be challenging at times, there are some long days (and some long nights) but overall we do it because we enjoy it. If I didn’t find it rewarding I think I’d stop being a guide

Does it pay well?

It pays enough, we don’t become guides for the money that’s for sure. There’s plenty better ways to earn lots more money, but we do it for the love of travel, and the rewarding nature of the job. If you guys are happy, then I’m happy, and that’s not many jobs that can be so pleasant so often.

Do you get loads of freebies?

Nope, Busabout provides us with accommodation, the rest is on us. I’m sure some guides are good at flirting and getting things for free, and there are occasions when we get to join you on excursions, but mostly we pay our own way.

Do you love it?

Yes – 100%

What’s your favourite tour?

Each guide has their own favourites for various reasons, for me though I love the HOHO Coach Network. I love the structure of it, meeting people, passing on information and setting them up to have a great time, then leaving them to it. It’s best once you’ve been going a week or so and you have some days off – your passengers catch back up and you can chat about the amazing experiences they’ve had. However Greece allows us to get to know our customers so much better, the 11 day tour means we can really get to know everyone and make some good friends. Each tour has its own benefits.

Should I be a tour guide?

If you want, then absolutely. I have worked in a lot of sectors, and tourism is by far the best, and being a guide is my favourite job of them all. It’s a rigorous training process, and I put in more effort to become a guide than I ever did for anything else, including my degree!

Does it get lonely?

Sometimes yes, it can be hard when you’re constantly meeting new people and struggling to make a strong bond, but that’s where your colleagues come into play. The drivers on the loops are in the same situation, and all the guides are happy to pick up the phone and have a chat if it’s what you need. You might be on your own, but with the Busabout team you’re never alone.

Do you have a girlfriend/boyfriend

Some guides do, and they make it work out there on the road. Personally I don’t, I’m a big fan of tinder! When I get days off I try to connect with some of the locals and get some time away from work. It may not be a very orthodox approach to exploring a city, but it’s been amazing for finding secret bars and restaurants I couldn’t have any other way.

Where’s your favourite place?

In Europe, I love Slovenia and think Lake Bled is one of the most amazing places in the world. I can’t recommend it enough.

Do you miss home?

Rarely to be honest, I have moved around so much over the last 10 years that I don’t have anywhere that really feels like home. I do miss English sausages, Cornish pasties and roast dinners though, along with my close friends and my family of course. The thing I crave most often though is pretty nerdy – I miss video games!

 

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Aegina – Quiet Greek Island

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This island sits only a short ferry from Athens, and if you’re looking for a break from the big city, you’ll struggle to find a better destination for a couple days.

IMG_20160802_142624229IMG_20160802_144524691I decided to explore the island after a shining recommendation from a friend, and I’m grateful for it. It’s easy to get to from Piraeus (Athens main port) with the fast hydrofoil ferry (16EUR each way, 20mins) or the slow one (12EUR return, 1hr30mins) leaving approximately hourly. Once on the island I found myself a nice lunch – there’s some great places just one street back from the seafront that are excellent value. You must try a Aegina Salad, similar to a Greek one, but with pistachios, the islands speciality crop.

With a full belly I set out to explore, renting a moped from one of the only two places in town I took the coastal road around to the north side, dipping through pretty little harbour towns, past stunning quiet beaches and over gorgeous headlands. The breeze thanks to the bike kept me cool, although I was on and off the bike plenty of times, grabbing some snaps or just having a quick stroll through a village.IMG_20160803_120258065There are a few points well worth investigating while on Aegina, a collection of old churches scattered on a hillside overlooking the main valley in the centre of the island, but when scaled to the top offers views down to the northern shores as well. Despite the heat the climb wasn’t hard, and gave me the adventurous kick I love so much. Each church had recent dedications, although as I reached higher it was clear that people preferred the lower ones for their visits, not wanting to over exert themselves.

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Next on the list, and only a minute down the hill is the Monastery and Cathedral, while the monastery is a rather sensible settlement, the cathedral is quite impressive, with a large dome framed on either side by impressive towers. The eastern influence is truly apparent with the architecture in these holy buildings XXXX. My last stop before I found my accommodation was the ancient site of the Temple of Apollo. A decent amount still remains, with enough ruined that it looks well used as well. The majority of the coloumbs are still standing, along with much of the roof structure. You can see where much of the base structure was built, and the useful signage means it’s possible to build up a pretty decent picture of what it would looked like when still functional

IMG_20160802_202921184_HDRI was staying in the town of Aegina Marina, on the eastern side of the island. Usually I don’t name the hostel/hotel I stay in, but the lady that runs the Flora Rooms was so lovely they deserve a mention. A top floor room with good views of the bay, plus homemade lemonade and cookies on arrival made me feel very welcome indeed. The village is rather basic, mostly tourist restaurants and shops, but nothing here was overly expensive. The vibe was more family friendly than the better known islands further south, no late bars, and certainly no clubs in that part of the island. I asked about a good place to watch the sun set, but the only option was to drive back to the main town (the big city as the Marina locals call it). But after some research I found that the highest mountain on the island was climbable, and would take about a half hour from the base, which was a half hour drive away. I had nearly two hours until sunset, so after a quick shower I got a shuffle on and headed south.

IMG_20160802_200355822Google estimated a 30min drive, but I feel Googles vehicle is not an underpowered, elderly moped, so I arrived with barely 25mins to make the climb. The way was rocky for sure, loose pebbles, shingle but nothing too steep. I hustled up as fast as I could, soon making my shower somewhat redundant thanks to the sheer amount of sweat I shed. I climbed, constantly watching the worlds finest countdown over my shoulder, hoping that I would make it to the top in time. 14 minutes after I started on the trail, I reached the summit.IMG_20160802_144524691That gave me nearly 10 mins to grab as many snaps as I could, and enjoy the view in all directions. It was a glorious sunset, made so much better by my solitary climb, I savoured it as long as I could, but knew it would start getting dark soon, so had to make my way back down again. Biking back home with two headlights pointing way out to the sides is definitely not recommended, but finding an appropriate challenge and completing it is the most rewarded experience I know.

IMG_20160802_160553183I congratulated myself with fresh swordfish steak at one of the restaurants opposite my hotel, not worrying about eating alone, surrounded by families and couples. Retiring to my room, I slept very soundly that night.

IMG_20160803_121847563The next day I set off to explore the little island off the southwestern corner, Moni. Checking out early I said goodbye and hit the road over to Aegina town, before cutting off down to Perika. I found a nice spot for breakfast as I’d heard the beach bar on Moni was somewhat overpriced – although this isn’t surprising as the island is totally uninhabited. The beach you arrive into is busy with tourists, with plenty boats in the bay, but it’s not hard to get away from them all. 5 minutes away is beach after beach, untouched and unpopulated, perfect for a truly relaxing experience on the island.IMG_20160803_122944581Moni is an uninhabited island, but there are some local residents worth finding. Peacocks and deer both thrive, but the peacocks are certainly much easier to find. The slopes near the main beach is full of them, scratching and pecking at the dirt to find food. It seemed likely that they’d be having a feast once the last of the people had left, hoovering up all the leftovers and dropped crumbs. I didn’t see any deer, but I hope to head back one night and camp out, hopefully then we can see a little more, and maybe climb the mountain there as well.

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Back from Moni it was a simple case of finding some lunch, returning the ped and jumping back on the ferry home. Two islands, well explored and I was ready to face the city again.

Hevy Festival

Yesterday I came home, tired with my ears ringing, head still filled with the songs of bands I’d heard that weekend.

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IMG_20150815_191946Hevy festival in Port Lympne, Kent is a predominantly hardcore and metal festival, with a few exceptions. But it’s not the bands that make this festival such a wonderful event, but the community. It’s so small, with only three stages stretched out in a small field, it takes only a few minutes to cross the entire festival site, so you can see all the bands with no issue, but also you’re likely to see the same people an awful lot, which includes old friends and stalwarts of the music scene. It’s amazing to still visit such a place and see people you’ve known for years still loving the bands and loving the music.

IMG_20150814_122257The whole thing is on the grounds of an animal park, and not far from the nearest town, so a cheeky run into town for some breakfast, or a wander around the wildlife park (included in the price) is just an added bonus, and a hot meal is always welcome mid-fest. The weather held out much better than expected so the usual wellies weren’t necessary, although it’s always nice to see people trying to dance with them on. Hopping from band to band with friends is an excellent way to spend a weekend in the sun.

IMG_20150814_211124If you like heavy, alternative music I can’t think of an event I’d recommend more. And if you’re visiting the UK and want to experience a real alternative community, this is a side of British culture you won’t see anywhere else. The furthest from the loutish football lads you can imagine especially as the average age rises.

I’ll be back next year, until then…

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Benjamin Duff

@versestravel